Category Archives: Books

Word Vancouver

I presented a bookmaking workshop at Word Vancouver between 3-4pm at the table of the Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild.

Participants decorated their book using the logo of the festival.  The book that says “Family Fun” really sums up the experience at this wonderfully literary festival.

If you missed the workshop, check out my tutorial.

word_20150927_IMG_5502 word_IMG_5490 word_IMG_5493 word_IMG_5507 word_IMG_5516 word_IMG_5524

word_IMG_5558 word_IMG_5530 word_IMG_5534 word_IMG_5540 word_IMG_5548 word_IMG_5544  or

VanCAF

I had a table at the Vancouver Comics Arts Festival (VanCAF) at the Roundhouse this week-end (May 23-24) to promote Old Pond Comics.

vancaf day 2

It was my first time at VanCAF as a vendor. It’s a curated show (meaning they carefully review each submissions and decide who gets to go in) so I was super happy to be accepted as a fellow cartoonist.

vancaf table

Many people recognized the word “Haiku” from something they’ve learned in school, years ago and stopped by to chat and buy some haiku-comics.

A few people recognized my comic strips from the monthly publication The Bulletin: a journal of Japanese Canadian Community, history + culture

Thanks to everybody who stopped by the table! I hope you will try to write haiku.

The Art of Suminagashi

Suminagashi (“ink floating” or “flowing ink paper”) is the earliest form of Japanese marbling that originated over a 1,000 years ago. Today I attended the 3-hour suminagashi workshop offered by Candace Thayer-Coe in partnership with CBBAG Lower mainland.

The tools are pretty simple. You need a suminagashi marbling kit, rice paper, brushes, big shallow water containers, a piece of plywood.

Suminagashi Suminagashi

The technique is pretty simple. Holding two brushes filled with two different colours, you dip the tip of the brush on the water surface, one hand after the other. The ink creates a circle that floats on water. And you keep alternating hands, in a continuous motion. It’s very meditative.

Suminagashi Suminagashi

One you’ve done enough circles and the surface is filled with ink, you can either place a piece of paper right away to lift the design.

Suminagashi Suminagashi

Or you could chose to modify the design by:

  • blowing gently on it
  • using a fan

Suminagashi

  • or using a piece of your hair to drag the ink.

The hair technique quickly became our favorite methods and was well worth the ‘hair sacrifice’ and the pain from pulling one’s hair.

Suminagashi Suminagashi

Suminagashi  Suminagashi

What surprised us the most was how quickly the design would change. We were creating circles until we were satisfied with the design.

Suminagashi Suminagashi

But by the time you came back from getting a sheet of rice paper, the design was completely different.  The circles had expanded to create marbling shapes.

Suminagashi Suminagashi

The transformation was part of the process. We just had to accept it.

Suminagashi Suminagashi  Suminagashi

The teacher gave us a frame so we could display our artwork.

Suminagashi Suminagashi

It was a fun afternoon. Considering a marbling kit cost less than $20, I would probably do some again.

Suminagashi    Suminagashi

Here are more photos from the class:

Suminagashi Suminagashi  Suminagashi Suminagashi  Suminagashi Suminagashi

 

How to make an accordion book with cover tied by a ribbon (tutorial)

Would you like to learn how to make an accordion book with a cover  like this? Then, just follow this simple tutorial. It only takes 15 minutes to make one!

kerrisdale_workshop_tremblay_IMG_9645

 

 

Material

  • Cardstock (for the cover): 9cm X 17cm
  • Construction paper (for the pages): 9X12 in
  • Ribbon: 1/8mm works well.
  • Scissors
  • Glue stick
  • Rulers.

Let’s get started.

 

1_IMG_9420 2_IMG_9421

1. Position your construction paper like this. Measure and draw a line at 3 inches mark.

3_IMG_9426 4_IMG_9428

2. Fold the page to the 3 inches mark. You made a first crease.

5_IMG_9429 6_IMG_9431

 

3. Fold the page to the 3 inch crease. Your paper now has 2 creases.

7_IMG_9432 8_IMG_9434

 

4. Fold the paper in half like this. This is the result.

9_IMG_9435 10_IMG_9436

5. Fold the bottom to the middle crease. This is the result.

11_IMG_9437 12_IMG_9438

6. Fold the top to the middle crease. This is the result.

13_IMG_9439 14_IMG_9440

6. Position your paper like this. Fold the two sides to the middle.

15_IMG_9444 16_IMG_9446

 

7. This is the result. Squeeze the paper so the middle crease does a mountain fold. The result should be a “W”.

17_IMG_9448 18_IMG_9449

 

8. Here’s another view of the accordion fold you should have now.

19_IMG_9450 20_IMG_9451

9. Position your paper like this. Draw a thin line (illustrated here by a strip of paper) over three or the four squares in opposite direction. Here, on the first row, we are cutting square 2-4 ; on the second row, we are cutting 1-3.

21_IMG_9453 22_IMG_9455

10. Cut each line (do not cut the last square!!!). This is the result.

23_IMG_9456 24_IMG_9457

11. Start folding the book.  If you folded correctly. The book should fold itself.  (Now can you see why they call this a maze book?)

25_IMG_9458 26_IMG_9459

27_IMG_9460 28_IMG_9461

29_IMG_9462 30_IMG_9470

12. You’ll end up with a square of paper. Hold the middle of the package. If you end up with a “bird” with two flaps like this, you folded correctly. The flaps will be the end paper of your book.

31IMG_9471 32_IMG_9479

13. Take your cover (9X17cm). Measure a ribbon 3 times the lenght of the book (3X17cm).

33_IMG_9483 34_IMG_9489

14. Apply a line of glue in the centr eof the book, lenghtwise. Go to the very edge. Position your book. Glue the top page (this will be your end paper).

35_IMG_9494 36_IMG_9498

15. Now glue the other flap. Your book is finished!

37_IMG_9501

16. Tie the ribbon. You are now ready to decorate your book with collage or rubber stamps. For example on how to decorate your book see this blog post:

Sakura Days Japan Fair Bookmaking workshop.

Bookmaking workshop at Sakura Days Japan Fair

On April 11 and April 12, 2015, between 2-3pm, I gave a bookmaking workshop at Sakura Days Japan Fair, as part of the activities in the Leith Wheeler Haiku House. The event took place in the glasshouse of the Van Dusen Garden.


 I showed about 30 people each day how to make a maze book with a cover tied by a ribbon. Then, participants decorated their book with collage using Japanese paper and rubber stamps. It was so much fun!

Missed the class? Here’s a tutorial.

IMG_1521IMG_1056 IMG_1058 IMG_1065 IMG_1066 IMG_1067 IMG_1068 IMG_1069 IMG_1070 IMG_1071 IMG_1073 IMG_1075 IMG_1077 IMG_1079 IMG_1081 IMG_1082 IMG_1083 IMG_1085 IMG_1086 IMG_1087 IMG_1520  IMG_1522 IMG_1525 IMG_1532 IMG_1535 IMG_1539 IMG_1540 IMG_1541 IMG_1543 IMG_1545 IMG_1546 IMG_1548 IMG_1550 IMG_1555 IMG_1556

Plastic Surgery Haiku? Yes Please !

yes pleaseRecently I read Yes Please, the autobiography of Amy Poehler, star of Saturday Night Live and Parks and Recreation.

Amy Poehler’s memoir is described as “A collection of stories, thoughts, ideas, lists, and haiku from the mind of one of our most beloved entertainers (…)” (jacket)

Haiku? Yes, haiku!

The media made a big deal out of the Plastic Surgery Haiku that appear in the book. Although they occupy only two pages out of 329 pages memoir, the haiku written in 5-7-5 syllables were mentioned in pretty much all the book reviews:

 

Plastic surgery

Requires a good amount

Of lying to friends

— Amy Poehler

I have to admit the haiku do stand out, with their red text over black pages.

The book is printed in full colors, which is really rare in the publishing industry because of the high cost of color printing, but color was necessary as the book includes not only photos but also many memorabilia (such as those you would usually find in a scrapbook) which are spread throughout the book: handwritten notes from high school notebooks, school report card, lists, tips, poems, e-mails, and photos from her career at improv, SNL, and Parks and Recreation and, of course, two pages of haiku!

Hey, shooting poison

In your face does not keep you

From turning fifty

— Amy Poehler

I have to say I was more intrigued by the memorabilia – lists, e-mails, and the haiku – than the storytelling chapters themselves. This book seems to cater to the multitasking, easily distracted mind of the 21st century reader who likes to skim more than they like to read.

I especially enjoyed the big, bold, colourful quotes that preceded each chapter. Spread over two pages, these quotes resembled internet meme:

Short people do not like to be picked up.

I wonder if that’s what the book of the future would look like: a gathering of memorabilia, quotes, haiku, and lists that would catch your attention, like any shiny thing on the internet, and four-page chapters that nobody would read because the haiku were the best part anyway AND the only thing people will remember and quote from your book.